FOLEY ON THE MEND

Doug Foley was at the office of his orthopedic specialist Friday instead of at Maryland International Raceway, continuing his battle with Clay Millican for the Top Fuel lead. The Sewell, New Jersey, driver is starting to mend from injuries he sustained in this past Monday's final round against Millican at the rain-delayed Canadian Nationals finals.

"Doug's doing a lot better. He's still really sore," Tim Lewis, business partner with Foley for the past six and a half years and co-owner of the Torco-sponsored dragster with him, said Friday.
Foley, recovering from a concussion, is banged up from head to toe and, according to Lewis, is "full of bruises."

Foley's left leg is broken in two places, just above the ankle and just below the knee. He has a separated right shoulder and four cracked ribs on his right side. He also suffered a chipped tooth.


Doug Foley was at the office of his orthopedic specialist Friday instead of at Maryland International Raceway, continuing his battle with Clay Millican for the Top Fuel lead. The Sewell, New Jersey, driver is starting to mend from injuries he sustained in this past Monday's final round against Millican at the rain-delayed Canadian Nationals finals.

"Doug's doing a lot better. He's still really sore," Tim Lewis, business partner with Foley for the past six and a half years and co-owner of the Torco-sponsored dragster with him, said Friday.
Foley, recovering from a concussion, is banged up from head to toe and, according to Lewis, is "full of bruises."

Foley's left leg is broken in two places, just above the ankle and just below the knee. He has a separated right shoulder and four cracked ribs on his right side. He also suffered a chipped tooth.

Lewis said Foley complained of a sore tongue, and everyone assumed he had bitten his tongue during the accident. However, he said, the doctor discovered that a chipped piece of Foley's tooth was embedded in his tongue.

Lewis said Foley "has no recollection of the run. He has no recollection of the entire day."

The crash "really rang his bell pretty hard," Lewis said "He would speak. The words were clear . . . but the sentences didn't make sense. I could see that his thought pattern was not right, and it concerned me a great deal. But it got better and better and . . . now his thought process is working."

Lewis said when the accident occurred, "I was a nervous wreck. I just was sitting there, watching my world come down, crashing around me. But I could see he was in good hands and he was going to get through this. . . . I'm confident now he will be."
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