:::::: Editorials ::::::

BOBBY BENNETT: SAGE ADVICE FROM AN OLDER ME

Dear Younger Me,

I see you sitting in the back seat of a massive Pontiac, on your way to see your first national event, the 1981 Spring Nationals in Bristol, Tenn. You are anxious, have stars in your eyes and with good reason. It's the first time you'll ever see the stars you've read about for two years in those major magazines. You'll see the colors; hear the beautiful sounds of drag racing at the highest level and for the first time in your life, inhale nitromethane.

THOMAS POPE: BEEN THERE, DONE THAT

 

 

For my first column for competitionplus.com, I want to take you back nearly 42 years to my introduction to drag racing as a part-time sports writer/student at The Fayetteville (N.C.) Observer.

In the summer of 1977, my local track was to host a sanctioned event called the NHRA Country Boy National Open. It was to be headlined by the Pro Comp class, which (for you young’uns out there) was a class that combined what you now know as Top Alcohol Dragster and Top Alcohol Funny Car. 

SUSAN WADE - LET’S HAVE THAT UNCOMFORTABLE CONVERSATION

susan_01.jpg“Hi! Thanks for being here! Come on in, have a seat, and make yourself uncomfortable.”

If Tami Powers, director of business development/operations at Alan Johnson Racing, could gather team owners, sponsorship-procurement specialists, and the NHRA marketing department and top executives, that’s probably how she would greet them at the door.

She has rebounded from the heart-sinking disappointment of an impressively innovative Top Fuel deal for Ashley Sanford that imploded on the threshold of the season-opener. Her experience and observations tell her something in drag racing’s business model is broken. But her intuition also tells her the problem is fixable.

DRAG RAGS: 1959, PART 2 — HOW THE SMOKERS BEAT THE FUEL BAN

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POST SCRIPT: LAS VEGAS - SALINAS DANCES, SCHUMACHER'S A DRAGSTER MAN AND THE CHALLENGES OF REPORTING ON-TRACK INCIDENTS

 

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Salinas dancing? Schumacher prefers dragsters. The NHRA has rules, and Ron Capps has someone to look up to.

OK, JUST ONE DANCE – The sun had set on the desert, and the glare of TV cameras no longer had trapped Top Fuel winner Mike Salinas in what he would call his most uncomfortable situation. Blathering in front of media members never has been the intensely driven Bay Area businessman’s cup of Folgers. Neither is showing his vulnerable side. Don’t you know? He’s a tough drag racer and nose-to-the-grindstone businessman, and don’t forget it.

Salinas, nothing like emotional Terry McMillen when the Amalie Oil Dragster driver finally broke into the ranks of NHRA Top Fuel winners at Las Vegas in October 2017, told reporters after his Denso Spark Plugs Four-Wide Nationals victory Sunday, “I’m going to go home and cry by myself.”

DRAG RAGS: 1959 - GARLITS GOES FROM ZERO TO HERO, TURNS PRO


A.J. Routt Photo

Don Garlits hogged so much of the ink spilled throughout 1959 that, in fairness to everyone else, we’ll devote two of these installments to drag racing’s biggest season yet. Garlits gets his own story because his first trip from Florida to the West Coast—indeed, the first cross-country tour by any drag racer—was the story of the year, if not of the young sport’s history thus far. 

Camshaft sponsor Ed Iskenderian negotiated with three Western promoters to create open events in California and Arizona. Win, lose, or fail to stage for first round (Don’s fate at Bakersfield), the stranger was guaranteed today’s equivalent of around $40,000. The late Pat Garlits often remarked that nice homes in Tampa could be bought for less. Her husband often reminded reporters that Wally Parks had been giving away some real nice trophies, a Norge washing machine, tools, and other donated merchandise to Top Eliminators of recent NHRA Nationals, but no dough whatsoever. The young couple still held nearly all of that loot when their worn-out ’53 Buick limped back home, too, because Mr. Isky sponsored new speed equipment and new racer friends offered lodging and meals at each stop.  

Their historic season was best documented by Drag News contributors and advertisers, particularly Iskenderian Cams. The accompanying clippings track drag racing’s first touring professional from March's humbling Bakersfield debut through December's triumphant California return at Riverside. Next time, we'll steer the column back into the groove and review what the rest of the sport was doing while the Swamp Rat was hogging these headlines in 1959. 

DRAG RAGS: ISKY STIRS THE POT DURING 1958

 

Two individuals from opposite coasts who’d yet to meet in person, Don Garlits and Ed Iskenderian, dominate this installment just as they did Drag News throughout 1958. The season opened to full-page “hero” ads shouting that the 170-mph barrier really had been blasted by some unknown Floridian in a crude, homemade fueler built from Chevrolet frame rails. The year ended with a controversial Dec. 27 cover story declaring that the 180-mph barrier had just tumbled to the same guy, at—suspiciously—the same Florida track. 

Of course, nobody out west swallowed either speed; possibly not even the savvy L.A. camgrinder promoting his newest hero in full-page Hot Rod and Drag News ads. If Ed Iskenderian did have doubts of his own, deep down, he’s never admitted to any. A time slip showing some big number was documentation enough for Isky’s promotions, whatever the prevailing track conditions and timing system. Never mind the customary backup run required of a track or “world” record (within two percent, at that time).     

BOBBY BENNETT - STANDALONE PRO STOCK SHOW NEEDED TO HAPPEN

There are things the NHRA can control, and there are others the sanctioning body cannot. On a part they could,  they aced it. 

The topic is the NHRA's inaugural stand-alone Pro Stock show. 

POST SCRIPT PHOENIX - FISHY STORY, INSULT OR FAVOR?, KA-BOOM!

The season is only two races old – less than one month old – and already we have shenanigans and controversy.

susan_01.jpgWe know Elvis was wrong. We CAN go on together with suspicious minds, and we will. And drag-racing folks simply will have to build their dreams on suspicious minds. But yes, as Elvis sang, “Here we go again . . .”

This time the buzz following the Magic Dry NHRA Arizona Nationals at Wild Horse Pass Motorsports Park centers on a couple of matters: significant shrapnel and the Pro Stock class’ new TV show. And we give a special Hard Luck Award of the Week to Funny Car racer Jack Beckman.

Here’s a look at the post-Phoenix scene .

POST SCRIPT POMONA - RANDOM RECOLLECTIONS FROM THE NHRA WINTERNATIONALS

 

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Here are some random recollections and revelations from the Winternationals . . .

BY THE TIME I GET TO PHOENIX . . .  – Steve Torrence is especially glad to return to Wild Horse Pass Motorsports Park, where the week before the Winternationals he made a brief test-session appearance, nonchalantly posted the best elapsed time and speed (3.689, 328.78), and went home two days earlier than his competitors. This time he wants to regain the lead in the standings. Doug Kalitta ended Torrence’s streak of elimination round-wins at 57 and knocked him from the No. 1 position he had maintained since last year’s visit to Chandler, Ariz. At this year’s Magic Dry Arizona Nationals, Torrence will go after another Tony Schumacher NHRA record. After missing out on the chance to tie Schumacher’s record for consecutive Top Fuel victories, he’ll seek to eclipse Schumacher’s record for victories throughout the course of three consecutive seasons. Schumacher won 26 races from 2007-2009 campaigns. Torrence has 19 since the beginning of the 2017 season. Of course, he’d rather focus on winning races and championships and eventually pass Schumacher’s eight titles.

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